More Novell bloggers

Open

Hot on the heels of Novell announcing updates to its blogging policy – now John Dragoon – Novell’s Chief Marketing Officer – has his own Novell CMO Blog.

For all of you who have supported Novell in the last decade or so – but have comments on Novell Marketing activities – this is for you. I have visited a lot of customers and partners, worked at enough BrainShares and other events to know that this will be a busy blog. Get reading and commenting!
There is also a consolidated page for all blogs at Novell.

More steps on the way to openness.

Who would you like to see blogging at Novell? Which other technology blogs do you read and respect?

Written at: Düsseldorf, Germany

Cables!

… I just hope I’ve not left my power cord at home.

Anyone who has travelled by air in the past year knows how tedious some of the rituals of security have become. Laptops, chargers, cables and anything similar are all subject to scrutiny.

Written at: San Francisco International Airport, San Francisco, CA.


I’m flying today to see customers and partners in Europe – I’ve got the following:

  • IBM Thinkpad Laptop + Charger
  • Apple iPod Nano + USB charger cable
  • US cell phone + Nokia charger
  • UK cell phone + Europe Nokia charger
  • Jabra bluetooth headset + charger
  • Targus Airpower
  • Assorted UK and European power converters
  • Headphones
  • Sony Digital Camera

[I’ll lay this out and take a photo]

All of this is with me in my hand baggage. It’s not heavy – just lots of individual pieces to keep track of.

What the world needs is ‘ZENworks for cables’ and the ultimate convergent device.

My wish list is:

Laptop with 2GB RAM, great screen, 6 hours battery life, fast processor, small and light.
One phone. With a 5 megapixel camera. Also with a 4GB iPod Nano built in.
One set of headphones. Bluetooth. Able to work with the phone and iPod.
One universal charger. For all of this.

The whole lot should weight less than 2 kilograms (4 lbs).

This wish list isn’t far off from reality – IBM/Lenovo, Apple and others have made massive strides with their laptops; Panasonic have exceptionally light yet rugged machines.

Nokia have a great cellphone and camera; there are rumours about real Apple iPod phones.

There are several bluetooth headphones on the market – I just need Shure to make some really good quality Bluetooth E5cs for this.

That’s my travelling electronics – I know I travel a lot lighter than many others. I know several people who travel with many many pieces of camera equipment. Some people wouldn’t be without their Playstation Portable.

What do you travel with? What couldn’t you live without on an extended trip? What would be your ideal ‘convergent device’?

Comments as always very welcome!

Written at: San Francisco International Airport, San Francisco, CA.

United Airlines and customer service

I travel a lot. I travel on United Airlines and the Star Alliance whenever possible. I think loyalty is mutual – both United Airlines and Star Alliance are Novell customers; they look after me well.

I’m currently stuck in Salt Lake City Airport – fog in San Francisco. I’ve missed my connecting flight to London. United has already transfered my itinery to the later flight; and I had a phone call from United Easy Update to let me know this.

I’ll be late arriving in Düsseldorf – but I should be there relaxed and in one piece.

Comment on ‘Small Print’

No sooner had I written about the Novell blogging policy – when I got a comment from ‘SaladDodger’ asking about my use of Creative Commons and how that fitted with my restrictions on reuse.

Hands up. I was caught.

I was mid-site change and re-included the Creative Commons license without clarifying the commercial reuse of my blog posts.

I’ve redone some of the wording – it should be clearer.

In summary – please link to, trackback and quote my posts in your own blogs. If you’re a commercial entity please ping me and let me know you’re doing it. Give me some attribution.

Novell on blogging

Open

Novell recently updated its internal policy governing how employees use the internet.

One notable change in the policy:

Personal websites, weblogs and other forms of online discussion are encouraged, and Novell respects employees’ use of them as a medium of selfexpression.

Obviously as a public company Novell requires that no confidential or proprietry information is posted. Novell has an ethics code that all employees are required to agree to (and electronically sign).

I think this is a good thing. Communication is becoming more open – Cool Blogs, Jeff Jaffe’s CTO Blog and Novell Open PR are all great examples.

Your feedback to date has been incredible and much valued. Keep it coming.

What else would you like to see here? Let me know. We do read and publish your comments.

Written at: Provo, UT

Novell on Blogging

Novell today changed the inernal policy governing how employees use the internet.

One massive change for the good:

Personal websites, weblogs and other forms of online discussion are encouraged, and Novell respects employees’ use of them as a medium of selfexpression.

Obviously as a public company Novell requires that no confidential or proprietry information is posted. Novell has an ethics code that all employees are required to agree to (and electronically sign).

A good policy.

One interesting part it seems like my small print has been quoted directly in the policy 🙂

Wifi on the road

I’ve blogged before about the various airports offering ‘free WiFi’ to customers – this is generally a great service.

Chicago O’Hare is rolling out a new wireless service in the public concourses – run by Concourse Communications this is billed as ‘Wifi Zone – A Concourse Network’ – and the all important word ‘BETA’.

I’m in the United terminal; near gate C5 waiting to wait list to an earlier flight to Salt Lake City.

I’ve got ‘good’ signal on my wireless NIC; but the service sucks. It’s slow, unreliable, disconnects – I get better throughput via GPRS on my cellphone.

City of Chicago – while this is beta make sure it’s free! Concourse Communications – fix it – this is truly the worst public WiFi I’ve had to use in a long long time. I can’t believe people pay money for this. I’m certainly asking for a refund.

[As an aside – I’ve not had problems with T-Mobile Hotspots in the United Red Carpet Club lounges]